Jesus De Luna

Jesus De Luna

Research Coordinator
Jesus De Luna

Jesus (pronounced "Geezus") is a first generation student who graduated with honors from Rutgers University in 2020 with a B.A. in Psychology and a Minor in Cognitive Science. He was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and immigrated to the United States in 2015. Since then, Jesus has been involved in several areas of the research process throughout various projects. At Rutgers University, he was a member of the Human Computational Cognition Lab, where he worked under the advising of Dr.s Pernille Hemmer, Julien Musolino, and doctoral candidate Laura Saad. Here, he was interested in exploring the intuitions behind our experience of the sense of agency. This was in line with his interests on how people make inferences and reason about ethical decisions. He has also worked with the Lab for Developmental Studies (LDS) at Harvard University under the supervision of Professor Susan Carey and Dr. Ivan Kroupin. At the LDS, he worked on questions regarding executive functioning and relational reasoning capacity in young children. Through this experience, he became exceedingly interested in the impact culture and individual experience have on the nature of our intuitive inferences and theories about the world. After graduating from Rutgers University, Jesus worked with Dr. Stephen Sheinkopf, from Brown University, at the Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk on the seminal RHINO Study. This study focused on looking at neonatal cry acoustics as early markers for autism risk. In other words, whether a baby’s cry can be used to predict autism risk. Besides having worked in research settings, he has also supported the development and well-being of children/adolescents through his times as a child life intern/volunteer at the Bristol-Myers Squibb Children’s Hospital, as well as through several mentoring positions. He hopes the work done in the STAR study can lead to a revaluation of our society’s intuitions regarding in-group Vs. out-group differences, meritocracy, the impact of unseen cumulative contributions on a person’s successes/failures, and the role of social support as a mitigating factor against stress intensity.