The Relationship between Rumination and Affective, Cognitive, and Physiological Responses to Stress in Adolescents

Citation:

Aldao, A., McLaughlin, K. A., Hatzenbuehler, M. L., & Sheridan, M. A. (2014). The Relationship between Rumination and Affective, Cognitive, and Physiological Responses to Stress in Adolescents. Journal of Experimental Psychopathology , 5 (3), 272โ€“288.
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Abstract:

Although previous studies have established that rumination influences responses to stressful life events, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain inadequately understood. The current study examines the relationship between trait rumination and affective, cognitive, and physiological responses to a standardized laboratory-based stressor in adolescents. A community-based sample of adolescents (N = 157) aged 13-17 completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Affective, cognitive, and physiological responses were obtained before, during, and after the TSST. Adolescents who engaged in habitual rumination experienced greater negative affect and more negative cognitive appraisals in response to the TSST than adolescents with lower levels of rumination. Rumination was unrelated to heart rate reactivity, but predicted slower heart rate recovery from the TSST, indicating that rumination might be specifically associated with physiological recovery from stress. Rumination is associated with negative affective, cognitive, and physiological responses following stressors, suggesting potential mechanisms through which it might increase risk for psychopathology.

Last updated on 09/13/2018